Writing In Little Spaces

Desperate for time, we are a culture that consumes information in snippets.

We race through our email and social media feeds, we breeze through headlines, summaries, and website posts, and we scan important full-page memos in search of keywords and significant points.

When people think about good writing, they usually don’t cite short messages. They often associate short messages in general with the haste and casualness of text messaging. But short-form writing – well crafted, clever, memorable, sometimes even eloquent – is all around us and has been for centuries. Think telegrams, proverbs, headlines, greeting cards, bumper stickers, and famous lines from speeches.

They prove that a short message doesn’t require that we abandon standards of good writing. Some principles and techniques of long-form writing are hallmarks of the short email, blog posts, summaries, tweets, and posts that we now call microcontent.

In this insightful webinar, writing coach Ken O’Quinn discusses how to make the most of small spaces in short email, blog posts, news summaries, tweets, and posts. Word arrangement, precise description, economy of language, rhythm, creative thinking, and the use of parallelism are among the key elements of compressed expression.

After purchase, you will be automatically re-directed to the webinar.

By Ken O’Quinn

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Praise from Clients

I learned more helpful tips than in any other writing course in the past 40 years. As an engineer, knowing the “why” is important.
David EiermanMotorola Solutions

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